MenTeach E-News - January 2013

MenTeach E-News
January 2014

1) Male educators sought in south New Zealand
2) Engaging men teachers...a real challenge in Malaysia
3) Male teachers for kindergarten schools in Vietnam
4) Teaching is one of the most important professions
5) Top male teachers at Erdiston College in Barbados praise programmes
6) Alabama Voices: Someone missing from schools
7) Men teaching in Ireland
8) Utah Dad also Teaches
9) Men in Early Childhood Education at the World Forum 2014 in Puerto Rico
10) 8th Annual ECMenz Summit in New Zealand - March 7 - 9, 2014

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1) Male educators sought in south New Zealand
Educators are urging more Southland men to train as early childhood education teachers, with only three working in the region.

The latest Annual Census of Early Childhood Education Services figures, released by the Ministry of Education and relating to June 2012, show only three of the 367 licensed early childhood teachers working in Southland were male.

Across New Zealand, there were 438 male teachers working with 21,017 female teachers.

Nationwide, this equates to one male teacher to every 48 females, but in Southland, the ratio is only one to every 121 female teachers. Read the article: http://www.menteach.org/node/2346

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2) Engaging men teachers...a real challenge in Malaysia
After 30 years of experience in early childhood care and education...only female teachers are being recruited in my centre.

I started engaging male staff in 2011 for a start. We have male teachers coming only for certain classes two contact hours per week. Gymnastics classes with Mr.Gan and Art and creativity classes with Mr.Adi and religious classes with Mr.Shukri.

The response were so good that children were very excited and looking forward for the class. Parents so far did not comment about anything...just okay. Read the letter: http://www.menteach.org/node/2347  

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3) Male teachers for kindergarten schools in Vietnam
Ho Chi Minh City is seriously lacking in qualified nursery male schoolteachers, since there are few takers for kindergarten teaching, said the city Department of Education and Training.

Figures from the Department show that out of 10 preschool-trained graduates, two quit their jobs while eight male teachers give up the profession altogether. As a result, the city is in dire shortage of male preschool teachers.

Nguyen Thi Minh Nguyet, deputy chief of the Bureau of Education in district 3 said that teacher Luong Trong Binh is the only male teacher in her district.

Teacher Binh graduated in 1991 when male teachers for daycare centers were unheard of. His small young pupils loved him. In 1994, he was appointed as vice headmaster of Preschool 7 and is now the headmaster of Preschool 11. Read the: http://www.menteach.org/node/2349

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4) Teaching is one of the most important professions
A National Education Association (NEA) report indicates that there are 785,151 male teachers in public elementary and secondary schools across the nation compared to 2.4 million women.

While middle school and high school may have brought a few more male teachers into the mix, the truth is, the teaching profession was and really still is, dominated by women.

Most states report that less than 30 percent of all teachers are male, with the average coming in around 25 percent. The survey revealed that Arkansas had the least amount of male teachers at 17 percent while Kansas led the pack with more than 30 percent.

To go a step further, male educators make up 2.3 percent of the overall pre-K and kindergarten teachers, while male elementary and middle school teachers constitute 18.3 percent of the teaching population. It evens out a little more at the high school level with men representing about 42 percent of the teachers overall. Read the article: http://www.menteach.org/node/2357

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5) Top male teachers at Erdiston College in Barbados praise programmes
Principal of Erdiston Teachers’ Training College, Barbara Parris is always happy when male teachers participate in the programmes offered by the College.

She is even happier when they gain distinctions and top classes, which are year by year, female dominated.

This Saturday, the College will have a graduating class of 243 teachers, out of that number 90 have gained distinctions, and several of those outstanding students are males.

 Roger Scott, one of the top males, has been a teacher for 13 years, he described his teaching style as becoming ‘very predictable and traditional.’
This prompted the foreign language teacher to find a way to enhance his teaching skills, so he applied to Erdiston Teachers’ Training College to pursue the Diploma in Education (Dip Ed) Secondary Programme with a focus on Spanish. Read the article: http://www.menteach.org/node/2359

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6) Alabama Voices: Someone missing from schools
Cuts in education funding have influenced a shift in our focal points regarding the quality of education in the public sector. While the No Child Left Behind Act implications are based upon that of every school in the nation accounting for 100 percent in terms of Adequate Yearly Progress, the achievement gap between majority and minority students remains and is continuously widening.

In particular, our black male students are being left behind more than any other subgroup.

Where are the role models for our young black men? I ask this not because I am a black female educator, but because it cannot continue to go unnoticed. Read the editorial: http://www.menteach.org/node/2361

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7) Men teaching in Ireland
The Irish News reported statistics earlier in the week illustrating how the decline in the number of male primary school teachers has continued in spite of initiatives aimed at increasing males into the profession (though the paper does not outline the nature of these employer-led efforts.)

In the current academic year, just 1,307 of the 8,473 primary school teachers were male, representing just 15% of the profession. Of these, some 60% of the males were aged 40 or older.

In post-primary schools, the ratio of female to male teachers is just 2:1, so the disparity is certainly most pronounced in the primary sector.

It is a picture that will become apparent to many parents of young children as they notice the absence of male teachers in the schools in which their children are enrolled. Read the blog post: http://www.menteach.org/node/2360

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8) Utah Dad also Teaches
The fifth grade students in Brad Ericksen's class know what their teacher will be doing after school today. They can tell by his outfit — a navy blue shirt and khaki pants.

He'll be working at Walmart.

"I work there to make ends meet," says Ericksen, whose wife stays home with their three kids. The fifth-grade teacher at Lincoln Elementary School works between 20 and 25 hours a week at his second job on top of working at least 40 hours a week as a teacher. And he's been doing this for more than two years.

"I'm not rich, but I'm happy," said Ericksen, who is one of two male teachers at the school — a pretty typical setup in elementary schools around the state, nationwide and even internationally. In Utah, just 11 percent of elementary teachers are male, according to '08-'09 data from the state. And the numbers are even bleaker for the earlier grades: Out of the 14 teachers in pre-K in the state in '08-'09, none were male.

Read the article and comments: http://www.menteach.org/node/2364

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9) Men in Early Childhood Education at the World Forum 2014 in Puerto Rico
Join over 800 early childhood professionals from more than 80 nations in San Juan, Puerto Rico, for a life-changing experience! At the 2014 World Forum you will be exposed to widely diverse perspectives and approaches to the care and education of young children. You will learn about the lives of children, families, and early childhood providers from all ethnic, cultural, political, and religious backgrounds. You will make friends for life across the globe. You will learn, work, converse, sing, dance, laugh, and cry. You will change others and you will change! Go to site to register: http://www.menteach.org/node/2367

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10) 8th Annual ECMenz Summit in New Zealand - March 7 - 9, 2014
Men and women are warmly invited to attend the Summit of the Early Childhood Men in NZ Assn (ECMenz). Friday will consist of political and research presentations and panels. Saturday will include fun learning workshops and roundtables on various gender, initial teacher education and workforce topics. For people staying over Saturday night, Sunday morning will provide the opportunity for social activities and visits to services around Wellington hosted by Childspace.

The Summit advocates for men to be involved in ECE, and includes new projects and presentations on gender issues, teacher employment, teacher’s work, boy’s and girl’s learning, children’s educational achievement, childcare practices, including dads in ECE settings, etc. Go to website to register: http://www.menteach.org/node/2365

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