1) Malaysian Ministry to recruit more male teachers
2) Some education jobs pay women more
3) What do parents think about male teachers?
4) African-American male teachers are a missing ingredient
5) A good Kindergarten teacher is worth $320,000 a year
6) Where the Guys Aren’t: Addressing the Lack of Gender Diversity in the Early Education Profession
7) No male teachers at nearly 100 primary schools
8) Council looking at ways to boost ‘role models’ for primary pupils
9) Department of Education Secretary Duncan wants more men teachers
10) Conferences – A chance to meet each other

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1) Malaysian Ministry to recruit more male teachers

The Malaysian Education Ministry will set a quota and take in a stipulated percentage of men every year for teaching posts to address the dearth of male teachers in schools. Education director-general Tan Sri Alimuddin Mohd Dom is confident the imposition of a quota will rectify the situation. The New Sunday Times had recently reported that male teachers would be extinct in 20 years if men were not encouraged to join the teaching profession. Read the article: /node/1430

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2) Some education jobs pay women more

It’s a common complaint: men make more than women in the workforce. But while that’s true overall (a recent study showed that full-time working women made 80% of the salary full-time working men made in 2009), it isn’t true for every career. Here are four careers where women bring home more bacon than their male counterparts. All statistics were pulled from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) June 2010 report “Highlights of Women’s Earnings in 2009”. Read the article: /node/1443

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3) What do parents think about male teachers?

MenTeach: More and more college and university students are doing surveys asking about male teachers. They notice that there are so few men so they end up doing a research project. The following are some comments from parents in answer to a survey:
1 a) If your child/children currently has or use to have a male teacher, does/did it bother you?
1 b) What if the teacher is teaching in a preschool, Kindergarten, 1st, or 2nd grade classroom (lower elementary)?
2) It’s a known fact that the education/teaching profession has more females than males. Current studies approximate that of all U.S. school teachers (K-12), only a quarter are males, and less than 10% of these teach in elementary school classrooms. How do you feel about this? What do you think about the parent’s comments? Read their comments: /node/1462

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4) African-American male teachers are a missing ingredient

William Alexander was all ears at his mother’s home in Riverside during President Barack Obama’s back-to-school message to kids Sept. 8. The Oakland elementary school teacher, who was in the area attending a conference, knows the importance of encouraging children to stay in school. In 2004, he became the first in his family to go to college. ‘My two older brothers dropped out of high school. My mother and father never finished. Now I’m trying to save my two nephews. There aren’t a lot of positive role models out there,’ said Alexander. Read the entire article: /node/1463

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5) A good Kindergarten teacher is worth $320,000 a year

How much do your kindergarten teacher and classmates affect the rest of your life? Economists have generally thought that the answer was not much. Great teachers and early childhood programs can have a big short-term effect. But the impact tends to fade. By junior high and high school, children who had excellent early schooling do little better on tests than similar children who did not — which raises the demoralizing question of how much of a difference schools and teachers can make. There has always been one major caveat, however, to the research on the fade-out effect. It was based mainly on test scores, not on a broader set of measures, like a child’s health or eventual earnings. As Raj Chetty, a Harvard economist, says: ‘We don’t really care about test scores. We care about adult outcomes.’ Read the article: /node/1468

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6) Where the Guys Aren’t: Addressing the Lack of Gender Diversity in the Early Education Profession

Attend a workshop this fall led by Kitt Cox. He writes: Men are rare in early education and care settings. Women are the majority in the early childhood teaching workforce. Recent Massachusetts workforce development policy recommendations for the early childhood field suggest that program staff reflect the diverse composition of communities served, yet men comprise less than 6% of that workforce. Read the description: /node/1469  

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7) No male teachers at nearly 100 primary schools

More than one third of primary schools across Cumbria have no male teachers. There are 275 local authority primary schools across the county, but, according to figures released by the Department for Education, there are 99 primary schools across Cumbria with only female teachers. The problem is mirrored across the country despite attempts by the previous Government to increase numbers. The number of men working as school teachers has reached a five-year low leading to concerns about a lack of positive male role models. Read the entire article and comments: /node/1471

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8) Council looking at ways to boost ‘role models’ for primary pupils
There are 156 local authority primary schools across the district, but according to figures released by the Department for Education, there are 19 primary schools across Bradford with only female teachers. The problem is mirrored across the country despite attempts by the previous Government to increase numbers. The number of men working as school teachers has reached a five-year low leading to concerns about a lack of positive male role models. Sue Colman, Bradford Council’s assistant director for learning services, said: “The recruitment and retention of male teachers within primary schools is a challenge being faced by education authorities across the country. Fourteen per cent of teachers in the district’s primary schools are men, in line with the national average. Read the article: /node/1401

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9) Department of Education Secretary Duncan wants more men teachers

Applause erupted Friday during a roundtable discussion at Jackson State University, and some of it was for the visiting national education secretary. But much was for JSU students interning at the university’s Children’s Defense Fund Freedom School, who spoke about the importance of teachers and teaching. The perception about teaching should change, former intern Rodney Phillips said to applause. After suggesting a national media campaign to “express the dire need to educate our youth,” he received more applause. ‘I couldn’t agree more,’ U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan said. Read the entire article: /node/1202

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10) Conferences – A chance to meet
There are numerous opportunities to meet other men (and women) who want more men teaching. In the United States there is an annual conference in November sponsored by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) – this year is will be in near Disneyland in Anaheim, CA. Read about some of the specific events: http://www.worldforumfoundation.org/wf/men/connect.php

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