MenTeach E-News
August 2012

1) 50 per cent more males in teaching
2) Interviews of “international experts” about men in early education
3) Man Up: Be a Teacher
4) TV Show interviewing male teachers
5) Creating future-minded African American men
6) Question: Should I transport a child alone in my car?
7) We need the men!
8) Our schools need more male teachers
9) Australian man: Founder of Males in Early Childhood Network Group
10) Greenville actor named district Teacher of the Year

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1) 50 per cent more males in teaching
According to the BBC, a report funded by the Department for Education (DfE) has suggested that men are not only increasing their presence in the education sector, but are doing so at five times the rate of women. The results of the report, carried out by The Teaching Agency (TTA), indicated that the greatest change had developed within primary schools. Lin Hinnigan, Interim Chief Executive of TTA, said “primary teaching is increasingly a career for the most able graduates. It offers the opportunity to earn a good salary and progress quickly.” Read the article: /node/1975

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2) Interviews of “international experts” about men in early education
Over 20 experts about men in early education have provided an interview in preparation for the The International Conference “Men in Early Childhood Education and Care” on the 27th and 28th of September 2012 in Berlin, Germany. Bryan G. Nelson is quoted: “It’s such a hopeful time for our work recruiting and retaining men to teach. I’ve presented about men teaching across the globe from Columbia, South America to New Zealand and have met amazing men and women changing the field of education and care.” Read about the other experts: /node/1984

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3) Man Up: Be a Teacher
Something about our visit to the Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative a couple of weeks ago stuck with me, and it’s only recently that my percolating thoughts on the matter have condensed into something bloggable. During the welcome presentation, a gentleman from the board of DSNI (or possibly DSNCS) came in to say hi. He spoke briefly but warmly. On the way out he turned and added: “And by the way. Fellas. Where you at? Stand up, stand up. [applause] Fellas, I’m glad you’re here. Ladies too, but fellas… thank you for being here.” At the time, I was caught off guard by the attention and the words. I think that was the first time it really directly occurred to me that I might want to think about what it means to be a male teacher. Read the rest of his article: /node/1980

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4) TV Show interviewing male teachers
I am the producer and host of the TV show for parents and teachers, CREATING COOPERATIVE KIDS.  Last month I did a segment on the importance of more men in education and I interviewed two members of our local MenTeach organization. If it’s possible, I would love to have you share the Youtube clip of that segment in your newsletter.  My show airs on over 200 community access channels from ME to CA, including New Zealand and South Africa. Read the editorial & comments: /node/1982

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5) Creating future-minded African American men
[MenTeach: If you want to contact Gary Favors about his program, check out his website: Hearts and Minds.] Of all the projects he completed in the Hearts and Minds program this spring, Roman Putman Jr. is most proud of his “future board.” The shy, well-spoken Fairfield boy, 8, spent hours scanning the pages of magazines for symbols, words or pictures that represent what he wants to do with his life: Become a doctor. So on his board he pasted a picture of one. Next to it are magazine cutouts of a dog, a convertible and a pretty girl (his future wife). The project, however, wasn’t just about envisioning his future. It’s also about mapping a course to get there. And Roman already has his “directions.” “Eat healthy, think big, go to college, set goals, get a good education,” he rattled them off to a reporter. Suddenly, he seemed more like 18, rather than 8. Read the article about the program: /node/1986

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6) Question: Should I transport a child alone in my car?
[MenTeach: We receive e-mails from readers about issues that they are facing. Can anyone provide him with advice? We’ve removed any identifying information to protect his privacy.] I am a male para-educator, and I currently work for the X County Public School District, in [a state in the United States], assisting developmentally disabled young post high school students in becoming more independent as young adults. In May 2012, shortly before the school year ended, our transitional program was shut down, and all of us paras were being farmed out to the high schools, and any students (from here on out) graduating from high school will be remaining in their high schools for another three years, until they reach the age of 21, according to state law.

I was supposed to be transferred to Y High School, which was my first choice, but I found out that I was going to be REQUIRED by the school district to transport one male student in the morning and one female student in the afternoon, alone in MY personal vehicle, for the next year. When I told my union rep of this, she took the entire summer to answer me, and she basically said that I would have to talk with my supervisors to see if they could somehow resolve this issue. I found out this week that since I wasn’t willing to transport, I would HAVE to take another position much farther from my home. Read his entire letter: /node/1987

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7) We need the men!
One of the things I cherish about my husband is his abiding concern for young children. When I was still so-not-ready to have babies, all my attention going to being as big in the world as I could possibly be, he was working on a project in the schools to help young children respond creatively to conflict. Then he took a job in a little cooperative nursery school in our neighborhood, steadily building his skills and experience. My attitude about the importance of caring for children was transformed dramatically by the birth of our first, and then our second son. His commitment stayed steady, as he incorporated our children into his own pre-school project, a unique blend of child care, parent groups and social emotional support for the whole family. Read her entire editorial: /node/1988

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8) Our schools need more male teachers
In recent years, education experts have converged on one big idea: Teachers matter. Studies show that years of good teaching can set a student on a good path, while years of bad teaching can do the opposite. Yet only a fraction of our teachers are the best and the brightest of their generation. According to a 2010 McKinsey report, nearly half of U.S. teachers come from the bottom third of their class. Here’s a simple idea that could dramatically improve the teaching quality: Hire a few good men. Go to website: /node/1990

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9) Australian man: Founder of Males in Early Childhood Network Group
While most men think of joining industries where they can flourish and secure their future, this young man chose for childcare. No wonder, he was the single male member amongst a group of 100 females studying the concept at TAFE and university in Newcastle. Read the article: /node/1992

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10) Greenville actor named district Teacher of the Year
In his first year of teaching, actor Will Ragland could always count on a standing ovation in the Bryson Elementary School cafeteria. “You walk in, and it’s like Caesar coming home from a conquest,” Ragland told The Greenville News then, in a profile about male teachers entering the field through a program for professionals with degrees in areas other than education. “The whole crowd erupts, and they start waving, everybody at once.” On Friday, the popular teacher and community theater actor got an honor rivaling some of the best standing ovations he’s received at local theaters. A decade after entering the field, Ragland was named Greenville County Schools 2012-13 Teacher of the Year. Read the article: /node/1994

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