1) It’s important to challenge ALL gender bias
2) More men turn hand to teaching
3) Role male teachers have in lives of children with absent fathers
4) Can bankers make the grade as teachers?
5) Fear and Anti-Male Discrimination in the Classroom
6) Teacher quit corporate job to make difference
7) More men teachers: Back to class for men in Australia
8) Simply Teaching – One man’s teaching journey
9) Call for Papers: ‘Male Teachers, Masculinities, and the Teaching Profession’
10) MenTeach on national New Zealand Television

ABOUT MenTeach
JOIN or DONATE to MenTeach
VOLUNTEER for MenTeach
Forward Our Message
To be Removed From the List

—————

1) It’s important to challenge ALL gender bias
We read numerous articles about gender bias. Our focus at MenTeach.org is primarily about challenging stereotypes and bias that men face in education. And we know this is important work. We also think it’s important to challenge any and all gender stereotypes and bias. If we allow stereotypes about women – our co-workers/teachers – then we are perpetuating the entire system of sexism. And ironically, it will hurt us. Read about a study about gender bias against female science teachers: /node/1267

—————

2) More men turn hand to teaching
The economic downturn is believed to be behind a jump in men training to be teachers – a welcome development for schools trying to even up the gender balance. But while secondary schools are pleased to see more male teachers coming through, they say recruiting and retaining enough suitable staff remains a problem. Massey University’s College of Education has almost doubled the number of men in its secondary school Graduate Diploma of Teaching course this year, up from 35 to 65.
Read the rest of the article: /node/1232

—————

3) Role male teachers have in lives of children with absent fathers
I am a few weeks away from my initial thesis submission titled, Understanding the role of male elementary school teachers in the social development of children raised by single-mothers in the Jewish community of Montreal, Canada.

It is a topic that has not received much attention. Sure, there is a concern for why men leave the teaching profession, and why there are so few, but what impact do they have on children in today’s contemporary society? This is the area I chose to study as a male elementary school teacher myself. Read his abstract: /node/1272

—————

4) Can bankers make the grade as teachers?
The room was packed so full that they were standing at the back, but we were an orderly and attentive lot. ‘Hands up those of you who’ve been into a school recently,’ our facilitator requested. A good number of hands shot up. ‘Those of you who didn’t put your hands up need to get into a school,’ she said with a stern look. Read the rest of the story: /node/1283

—————

5) Fear and Anti-Male Discrimination in the Classroom
In his book The Culture of Fear: Why Americans Are Afraid of the Wrong Things, Barry Glassner discusses how Americans have become unnecessarily fearful of many things, thanks in good part to opportunistic politicians, single-minded advocacy groups, sensationalist news media, “news magazine” programming and so on. Such irrational fear complexes can do profound and unjustified harm not just to the directly affected individuals and groups, but to society as a whole. Read the rest of this man’s experience with being affectionate with young children: /node/1285

—————

6) Teacher quit corporate job to make difference
On Sept. 12, 2001, Andre Mountain submitted his resignation and booked a flight home. The terrorist attacks a day earlier jarred him, and he no longer wanted to sit in a cubicle of a Merrill Lynch office in New Jersey, performing the tedious task of verifying a long list of stock prices before a sale could be finalized. The attacks reminded him how short life is, he said, and he wanted to serve the interests of the community rather than those of a corporation. ‘Teaching was always nagging at me in the back of my mind,’ Mr. Mountain said. Read the rest of his story: /node/1286

—————

7) More men teachers: Back to class for men in Australia
An Ipswich school is defying trends and putting men back in front of the class with more male teachers than women.

St Edmund’s College has 33 male full-time teachers (57 per cent) and 25 female teachers (43 per cent) this year. Read the article: /node/1288

—————

8) Simply Teaching – One man’s teaching journey
This is an interesting blogpost from a male teacher. He tells an interesting story about his getting hired and cites numerous articles on the internet. This is an excerpt.

Why is there a lack of male teachers in the elementary school grades? I find it to be a very fulfilling job, so where are all the other guys? In this article, ‘It’s elementary: Male teachers rare-Primary school is still mainly a woman’s world’ from the Seattle Post-Intelligencer we are introduced to a third grade teacher Andrew Bean. He explains why teaching can be a very rewarding job when he says that teaching ‘…can be exhausting and very demanding, but I see it as this constant intellectual challenge … you have to be constantly thinking on your feet. I wish that could be understood and honored and respected.’ I think this is a key explanation about why some men enjoy the art of teaching (and women too!). Everyday is new and different and you never know what problems you will have to solve or what challenges you may face. Read the rest of his interesting story: /node/1290

—————

9) Call for Papers: ‘Male Teachers, Masculinities, and the Teaching Profession’
The Journal of Men’s Studies is planning a special issue dealing with male teachers, the importance of male teachers in the lives of young children, and the teaching practices that both encourage and discourage males from entering the teaching profession.

We especially want to highlight research that is moving in the direction of incorporating intersectional identities like class, race, sexual orientation, ability/disability, and so forth. Other questions of interest would be (but not limited to): Is a different perspective on the roles of schools and all teachers needed to encourage a different ethos when it comes to gender? What is the role and responsibility of educational programs in creating a real space for males in the early grades classrooms? What makes males enter the teaching profession despite the social and personal barriers that discourage them from teaching in the early grades? What educational policies and educational programs can realistically alleviate the lack of male teachers in the early grades? Read the entire call for papers description: /node/1300

—————

10) MenTeach on national New Zealand Television
After presenting at the 4th Annual Men in Early Childhood Education New Zealand conference I had the opportunity to appear on TV3 a national morning show (thanks for arranging that Adam Buckingham!). By the way, I had special bumper stickers made for NZ because in certain parts of the world diapers are called nappies. See the clip: /node/1302

—————

ABOUT MenTEACH: This email Newsletter has been distributed by MenTeach – a clearinghouse with a mission to increase the percentage of men teaching.

Forward Our Message – be sure to forward this message to anyone you think might be interested in teaching children.

JOIN or DONATE to MenTeach today – support our mission to increase the number of men teachers.    https://menteach.org/join_or_donate

VOLUNTEER for MenTeach – help make a difference by volunteering with MenTeach. We could use help moderating forums, posting articles that you find, updating the bibliography, hosting a group in your region, do some research about the percentages in your state, get involved and make some new friends. Drop us a line to let us know what you’d like to do.

E-LETTER POLICY FOR INCLUSION: MenTeach’s monthly e-letter includes news/resources/events that are relevant to those interested and supporting the education, support and care of children and families and who want qualified men teaching children.

To be Removed From the List
Go to this link and manage your account:

Men Teach E-News