MenTeach E-News
March 2010

1) Radio Interview: Fear of Men In Early Childhood Education
2) New Zealand Teacher calls for more men to join the profession
3) 50% rise in men applying to be primary teachers
4) Canada: Bridging daycare’s gender divide
5) In search of black male teachers
6) Men wanted – because teaching isn’t just women’s work
7) Program aims to channel more black males into teaching
8) See a video: Primary schools seek male teachers
9) Men’s Stories: From Japan to New Zealand
10) Resources – Men teaching data for 2009

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1) Radio Interview: Fear of Men In Early Childhood Education
Whether it’s on the quiet or in your face the fear of men in early education is widespread.  Yes, it’s difficult to quantify and talk about, but it’s real. From parents, to administrators the fear of men who work with young children has a significant impact in classrooms and beyond. We brought together a parent, a male educator and early education attorney to look at the fear and the reality of Men in ECE. Listen to the podcast: /node/1308

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2) New Zealand Teacher calls for more men to join the profession
[MenTeach: Adam Buckingham is one of the organizers of the Men in ECE NZ. You can read his story on the MenTeach site.] New Zealand children are disadvantaged by a lack of male early childhood teachers, a North Shore teacher says. Adam Buckingham wants men to become early childhood teachers after learning that fewer than 2 percent of preschool teachers in New Zealand are men – the lowest rate in the world, he says. Read the entire story: /node/1319

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3) 50% rise in men applying to be primary teachers
The number of men applying for teacher training has risen sharply because of the recession, says the body responsible for training teachers. There was a 52% rise in the number of men wanting to be primary school teachers – more than 4,700 in 2009/10, up about 1,500 compared with 2008/09. Read the full article: /node/1321

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4) Canada: Bridging daycare’s gender divide
There are the same little wooden cubbyholes, small jackets and frayed scarves hanging from hooks that you find in any child-care centre. The same book corner and tiny plastic couch. The same miniature chairs around miniature round tables. What’s most striking about Beatty Buddies Daycare is the men. Big strapping men. Read the rest of the story: /node/1325

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5) In search of black male teachers
Within that paltry 9% of the total teaching population that is male, only 7% of it is black, that comes out to 1% of all American teachers. Hispanic males are severely under-represented as well; they come in at 6%. Both Hispanic and African American boys combine to form the core of Chicago Public Schools’ (CPS) most perplexing academic and disciplinary challenges. Read the rest of his editorial: /node/1327

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6) Men wanted – because teaching isn’t just women’s work
More than a quarter of England’s primary schools do not have a male teacher. This is the conclusion of a – for once – interesting and worthwhile Government survey. Our son, who started school last September, is the only boy in his year. Most of the time he’s happy enough but, every so often, declares himself ‘fed up of girls’. Like the schools highlighted in the survey, the staffroom at his village primary is all-women. It’s important to make clear that you couldn’t wish for a more talented or pleasant group of professionals. Their teaching skills are always ranked at the highest – outstanding – level. They know everybody’s name and always find time to talk. Read the rest of her story: /node/1329

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7) Program aims to channel more black males into teaching
After working with at-risk youth for 10 years through the Department of Social Services, Benjamin Glover has found a job he thinks will allow him to make a bigger difference in the lives of children: Teaching third grade at James J. Davis Elementary School. He is the only black male teacher at the school, where he has taught for two years. ‘The male presence, period, is definitely needed in a classroom setting,” he said. “With the plight of black America, the plight of African-American males, it is highly important that they have representation in elementary classrooms. … It’s good for them to see themselves as viable, successful young men.’

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8) See a video: Primary schools seek male teachers
More than a quarter of primary schools in England don’t have a single male teacher. Research shows men are important for building confidence and providing role models for children. But figures show the staff in 4,587 out of 17,205 primary schools in England are all-women. There are worries this could have a negative impact on many children. However, one school in Kidderminster is bucking the trend with five male teachers among its staff of 33. Watch a video and read the article: /node/1333

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9) Men’s Stories: From Japan to New Zealand
It’s been seven years working at Kids’ Domain Early Learning Centre in Auckland, New Zealand. I have spent three years to qualify in New Zealand as an early childhood educator. I’m originally from Japan. I have been living in Auckland for 10 years. I like the relaxed life style in New Zealand.

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10) Resources – Men teaching data for 2009
The Bureau of Labor Statistics collects annual data about percentages of adults working in different careers. You can see those numbers on our website and also download a list of other careers so you can see how other professions are doing: /node/34

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