1) Do we need more male teachers?
2) A Few More Few Good Men in New Zealand
3) Mr. “Magg” talks about Washington Post blog
4) Florida school encouraging more black men to become teachers
5) University program aims to attract more African-American males to teaching
6) The latest percentage of male teachers in the United States
7) One man’s struggles to be a teacher
8) Special Report: Men Teaching in Canada
9) A male teacher refuses to leave teaching
10) A Success! 5th Annual Summit of EC-MENZ in New Zealand

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1) Do we need more male teachers?
Ronald Maggiano is somewhat unusual in the teaching profession. That is because he is male. Maggiano is an award-winning teacher in the Social Studies Department at West Springfield High School in Virginia. He has taught in public and private schools for 25 years. In a piece on his blog called “The Classroom Post,” he calls for more males to enter the profession. Read the full editorial: /node/1624

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2) A Few More Few Good Men in New Zealand

Good news for children and families – more men are being employed in early childhood services. But the bad news is continuing for the ECE sector as the percentage of male staff remains lower than it was pre the early 1990s. In 1992 there were 154 men out of a total of 6,568 staff in licensed teacher-led early childhood services. In 2010 this increased to 349 men and the total number of staff (men and women) has also increased to 19,901. Read the story: /node/1627  

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3) Mr. “Magg” talks about Washington Post blog

Washington Post education blogger Valerie Strauss featured my article, “We Need More Men Teaching our Kids,”  on her daily blog, The Answer Sheet. This is way cool! In a piece called “Do We Need More Male Teachers?”  she wrote, “If you believe, as I do, that teaching (and teaching well) is as important a job as any, then it is equally important that young people see both men and women actively involved.” Ms. Strauss is a veteran education reporter and her blog ranks as one of the premier education sites on the web. Needless to say, her support on this important issue is greatly appreciated! Read his blog: /node/1628

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4) Florida school encouraging more black men to become teachers
When Clifford Brady walked the halls of Roland Park Elementary some 35 years ago, students knew their hair had better be combed and their shirts clean. One of them was Lionel Bryant, a sixth-grader who would grow up to work with students at the same school. “When I looked at that powerful African-American educator, I said ‘Wow!’ ” recalled Bryant, 46. “It was a ‘Wow!’ factor.” That’s because there weren’t many men teaching in those days – especially black men. There aren’t today, either. Read the article: /node/1630

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5) University program aims to attract more African-American males to teaching
African American children comprise 17 percent of the student population nationwide, but their chances of seeing an African-American male teacher in front of their classroom are about 1 in 100. Hoping to close that gap, Eastern Kentucky University recently became the first college or university in the Commonwealth or any adjacent state to join the Call Me MISTER (Mentors Instructing Students Toward Effective Role Modeling) program, a national initiative begun at Clemson University that seeks to attract more African American males to the teaching profession. The MISTER acronym also refers to the classic film “In the Heat of the Night,” in which Sidney Poitier’s character demands respect with the line, “They call me Mister Tibbs!” Read the story: /node/1631

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6) The latest percentage of male teachers in the United States
You can see the 2010 United States Bureau of Labor Statistics data about numbers and percentages of teachers. If you compare the 2010 data with 2009 there are some changes. Check out the data and then go look at the previous years. /node/1632

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7) One man’s struggles to be a teacher
Since I wrote that e-mail to you, I have succeeded in getting placed on the substitute teacher list for the X Unified School District. This did not happen easily. I applied last fall, even getting the fingerprinting done, and though they added many substitutes to their list in December, I was not one of them. I enlisted the aid of several teachers I knew in the District to call on my behalf and request that I be added to the sub list. I pestered the HR office with repeated calls. All of this was to no avail. Then, inexplicably, I got a call from the female principal of an elementary school in X asking me to come in to interview for a long term sub position. I have no idea how this happened, but I assume that it stemmed from one of the many applications I submitted to the District every time there was a job posting. Perhaps I was the token male on the interview list. [I know that souncs cynical, by my application count is now over 100; I have an exceedingly stong resume; I have been applying for elementary teaching jobs for a year and a half at this point; this was only my second interview]. Go to website: /node/1634

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8) Special Report: Men Teaching in Canada
[MenTeach: See video interview with Jon Bradley] Teaching elementary or high school has never been a very popular career choice for men. But the number of men choosing to teach in the 21st century is extraordinarily low. Jan Sylvain-Champagne is one of the few men in the first year of a four-year teaching degree at McGill University. Often he is the only man sitting in a classroom with 30 women. “The immature side of me says it’s wonderful. But when I look at it more from my adult and teaching eyes, I’m saddened,” said Sylvain-Champagne. Saddened because male teachers at the elementary level — where Sylvain-Champagne wants to teach — are few and far between. Only 22 percent of teachers in Quebec are men — just 13 percent at the elementary level. That number has been dropping for two decades and it’s at the point where some schools, like St. Edmunds in Beaconsfield, have not had a man on staff for years. Norm Horner was one of the last men teaching at St. Edmunds. /node/1636

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9) A male teacher refuses to leave teaching

Approximately 24 students will be officially inducted into Claflin University’s Call Me MISTER program. The Call Me MISTER program is designed to increase the number of African American male teachers working in South Carolina’s classrooms. Call Me MISTER collaborator Hayward Jean said, “There is an overabundance of negative role models out there today. “We are creating positive role models for children inside and outside the classroom” Jean said the induction ceremony is the first of its kind and marks the start of a major push to recruit more minority teachers. A teacher at Marshall Elementary School, Jean won the 2009 NAACP Presidential Citation for Education Advocacy. But he acknowledges that his path to success didn’t come without a mentor. Years ago, he was watching television one night when Salome Thomas-El, an education consultant and author, appeared on C-SPAN. He was amazed by the consultant’s enthusiasm for teaching. Read the article: /node/1637

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10) A Success! 5th Annual Summit of EC-MENZ in New Zealand

We enjoyed a great EC-MENz Summit in Peel Forest, Canterbury, New Zealand, deep in the wild country, this time. We had an emphasis on the different approaches that men can bring to the education of highly active children, encouraging managed risk-taking among children, and exploring the natural environment from a child’s view.

Even more valuable was the networking and affirmation which took place during the Summit. We were very pleased to see that our attendance and contribution was enhanced by a considerable number of women teachers, some coming from as far as Northland to take part. Read about the event: /node/1633
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