1) Male teachers in Canada primary grades
2) Male teachers express importance of their presence
3) Vietnam: Lack of male teachers reinforces stereotypes
4) Lack of male primary teachers sparks concerns in United Kingdom
5) Kindergarten teacher receives Award in Canada
6) Looking for male role models in Australia
7) Where have South Australia’s male teachers gone?
8) New Jersey schools are looking for quite a few good men
9) Good for the goose, why not the gander? Irish men caring for young children
10) Jon Bradley: Are we leaving our boys behind?

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1) Male teachers in Canada primary grades
Jim Hopkins strolls through the playground outside of Stuart Baker Elementary School. The sounds of children playing fill the air as school buses roll into the parking lot and students prepare to head home for the day. Hopkins spots a young boy walking next to the slide with a large piece of driftwood in his hands. He makes his way over to the student. Read what happens next: /node/1526

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2) Male teachers express importance of their presence
America’s growing teacher-gender gap extends to the First Coast, where there’s a scarcity of men in elementary and secondary classrooms. Three area teachers tell what it’s like to be among the few men in teaching in our schools. Read what they are saying: /node/1538

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3) Vietnam: Lack of male teachers reinforces stereotypes
Chu Hoang Tung’s parents were very surprised to see a man teaching their son’s class when Tung entered the fifth grade at Le Ngoc Han Primary School. Tung’s mother Nguyen Thi Thoa says she had never seen a male primary school teacher when her older daughter, now a university student, was in school. But, she said, “My son’s studies have been excellent this year since he’s been learning with a male teacher.” “It’s very interesting to learn from a man,” added fifth-grader Tung. “He is very sympathetic, particularly with the boys in the class. He’s my idol. We can talk with him about many private male issues.” Read the entire story: /node/1541

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4) Lack of male primary teachers sparks concerns in United Kingdom
Fewer than one in eight Sheffield primary school teachers is a man – sparking new fears boys are not interacting with the male role models they need during their most formative years. Only 215 men are currently teaching in city primaries, compared with 1,588 women – and the picture has barely changed over the last decade. The profession as a whole is dominated by women, with females outnumbering males by three to one, but the imbalance is far greater in primaries. Nationally almost 30 per cent of primaries have no men at all on their staff, meaning boys will not be taught by a male teacher until they reach secondary school. Read the entire article: /node/1543

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5) Kindergarten teacher receives Award in Canada
Infant kindergarten teacher Greg McGlynn stands among a group of students after receiving the Magic 100 Golden Apple Award on Thursday. There was a time, not that long ago, when the ultimately sign of respect a student could show his teacher was to place a shinny red apple on the teacher’s desk. On Thursday, Greg McGlynn, a kindergarten teacher at Divine Infant Catholic School in Chatelaine Village, received a shinny apple of the golden variety as a recipient of Magic 100’s Golden Apple Award. Read the story: /node/1545

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6) Looking for male role models in Australia
Primary school children risk facing a lack of adult male role models, as fewer than 20 per cent of primary school teachers are male. While the number of female primary school teachers continue to grow, it appears male educators are a rare breed. Mark Osborne, from Immaculate Heart Primary, is one of only two male teachers at the Leichhardt school. The year-five teacher said more male primary school teachers were needed. “We need a lot more men in junior education,” Mr Osborne said. Read the article: /node/1547

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7) Where have South Australia’s male teachers gone?
Fewer than one in five students studying teaching in the state’s universities and TAFEs are male as the exodus of men from schools worsens. South Australian Tertiary Admissions Centre figures for 2009 show there are 152 males (or 19 per cent) and 650 females enrolled in teaching courses. This compares to a ratio of one male to four females only three years ago. Australian Bureau of Statistics figures show there are 1923 more female teachers in SA than 10 years ago, compared with 138 fewer males. Read the article & over 200 comments: /node/1550

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8) New Jersey schools are looking for quite a few good men
David Thies was one of those kids who played school at home. “I’d rope in my grandmother and sister to be my students,” he said. By middle school, he knew he wanted to be a teacher and work with elementary school children. What he did not realize right away was how unusual that would make him. “People would tell me elementary schools needed more male teachers, and I would be in demand,” he said. “They were right.” Read the entire article: /node/1554

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9) Good for the goose, why not the gander? Irish men caring for young children
As a self-employed joiner, Co Down man Patrick Coulter used to spend his working life organizing sub contractors and chasing clients for unpaid bills. Now he earns a wage from, among other duties, icing fairy cakes, putting plasters on knees and telling stories. The 42-year-old is one of only two registered male childminders in Northern Ireland and he currently looks after a three-year-old girl, a seven-year-old boy and his own seven-year-old son in his home in Mayobridge, near Newry. In a couple of weeks he will add nappy changing to his daily tasks when he starts taking care of his youngest charge an eight-month-old baby girl. Read the article: /node/1558
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10) Jon Bradley: Are we leaving our boys behind?
The Faculty of Education’s Jon Bradley has been highly sought-after in the media lately. A specialist in boy learning, he’s been outspoken on the feminization of the school environment and curriculum, the over-use of drugs like Ritalin among boys and the endangered male elementary school teacher. He’s argued that these are just a few of the seemingly separate issues that may be contributing to our province’s abysmal high school dropout and failure rates. Recently, he spoke candidly to the McGill Reporter about these issues and one thing was exceedingly clear: while Bradley’s been at McGill for some 40 years, he’s also an elementary school teacher through and through. Read the rest of the interview: /node/1534

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