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Do boys need more male teachers?

Nick Murray - Sooke News Mirror
Children may have a hard time finding a male role model to look up to in the classroom.

Statistics show women greatly outnumber men as educators, a trend that is seen in classrooms across Greater Victoria.

Dave Eberwein, superintendent of the Saanich School District, recognises that students need to be able to relate to their teachers but does not think biological sex is much of a factor. “The most important thing is having at least one adult a child can relate to, that they trust and that believes in them.”

Invitation to Participate in a Study

My name is Eliza McWilliams and I am an Ed.D. candidate at Central Michigan University in Mt. Pleasant, Michigan. As part of my doctoral research, I am conducting a study on male teachers working in early childhood education (prekindergarten) in public schools. The study will focus on the problem posed by the lack of male teachers in ECE in conjunction with the need for more male teachers to serve as positive role models for young children, particularly those from fatherless households.

Inequality in day-care centres: Male educators are more likely to work temporary

Many parents and educators want more male professionals in day-care centres and kindergartens – however, men have greater difficulty to get into daycare centers in permanent employment. This is the result of a new study of the Delta-Institute for Social – ecological research.

Men in primary schools put up with unfair comments about their health, appearance and career progress, says this teacher.

Being a male primary teacher can sometimes be lonely. Around one in 10 primary teachers are male and at times you can find yourself as the only man in the staff room, perhaps even the first male teacher in that school, ever. That being the case, I’m pleased to say that most of the time gender is not ultimately a factor and you don't think about it – you just crack on, doing your job the best you can.
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