News

Dundee Scotland equalities champion: More men should work in nurseries

by Jon Brady - Evening Telegraph
Councillor Lynne Short has called on council officers to ramp up efforts to recruit a greater number of men into the city’s nurseries.

Official figures from the Scottish Social Services Council, which manages Scotland’s early years workforce, shows just 2% of it is male.

The rates vary from as much as 8% of creche staff being male to as little as 1% working in playgroups.

MenTeach E-News - April 2020

MenTeach: COVID-19 has changed the way we interact, especially as teachers. How are you coping with the changes? Is your center or program still open? Send us an e-mail so we can share what is happening throughout the world.

1) What is it like to be a male teacher in early education?
2) Summit for male students of color discusses the difficulties they face in going to college — and finishing
3) Black Male Educators In St. Louis Have A Formula For Boosting Their Numbers
4) Why Men of Color Like Me Are Leaving the Classroom

Letter: More men needed in early childhood education in Canada

by Jayden Aylward - Sarnia - Canada
I am a second-year student in the early childhood education program at Lambton College and want to address the lack of men in the field.

I believe more men want to get in this field but feel the stigma is pushing them away. They should be welcomed and wanted in caregiving positions.

According to the College of Early Childhood Educators, 1.4 per cent of registered ECEs are male.

Does the childcare field have gender discrimination?

by Marissa Couch - The Wright State Guardian
Upon walking into a childcare facility, the majority of the teachers employed will be female. The ratio of men working in a childcare program compared to females is heavily skewed.

Wright State University student Jacob Shaw has worked with children for most of his life.

He currently holds a position at a local childcare center as he pursues his bachelor of science in Elementary Education.

Half of Gloucestershire primary schools have no male teachers

by Ellis LaneSenior Digital Reporter
Half of all primary schools in Gloucestershire have no male teachers.

New analysis of school workforce figures has revealed that 52 primary schools in Gloucestershire have an all-female teaching staff.

Excluding schools where the gender split of teachers is not available, that works out as 50 per cent of all primaries in our area.
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